Arlo wants you to Be Air Aware!

Ozone and the Air Quality Index

Dallas is one of ten counties in the North Central Texas region that the EPA has designated as a non-attainment area for ozone concentration.  This means that ozone concentrations exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard.  Ground-level ozone poses a risk to human health.  Concentrations are regularly monitored and forecast using the Air Quality Index (AQI) to alert residents when they should take precautions.  The AQI uses a color code to indicate air pollution levels on a daily basis.

Arlo is your guide to the AQI

Arlo and the Air Quality Index AQI

This is Arlo, the AIRmadillo.  He works at Air North Texas, and helps alert residents in North Central Texas about local ozone conditions.  His shell is special – it changes colors to correspond with the Air Quality Index. 

 

#Arlo wants to help you understand the Air Quality Index local ozone conditions. #CAAD2017 Click To Tweet

 

When Arlo’s shell is green, it means that air quality is good and safe for everyone.

Arlo the AIRmadillo green AQI

 

When his shell is yellow, the AQI is moderate and unhealthy for very sensitive groups. 

Very sensitive groups are people with asthma or respiratory illnesses.  On yellow days, they should limit prolonged outdoor activity and heavy exertion.

Arlo the AIRmadillo yellow AQI

 

When Arlo’s shell turns orange, air quality is unhealthy for all sensitive groups.  

Sensitive groups are people with lung diseases (such as asthma), older adults, children and teenagers, and people who are active outdoors.

Sensitive groups should:

  • Reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.
  • Take more breaks, do less intense activities.
  • Watch for symptoms such as coughing or shortness of breath.
  • Plan indoor activities.
  • Schedule outdoor activities in the morning when ozone is lower.
  • Follow your asthma action plans and keep quick relief medicine handy.

 

When his shell is red, it means that air quality is poor and unhealthy for everyone.

Arlo the AIRmadillo red AQIPeople in sensitive groups should be especially careful on red ozone days.

Sensitive groups should:

  • Avoid prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.
  • Watch for symptoms such as coughing or shortness of breath.
  • Plan indoor activities.
  • Follow your asthma action plans and keep quick relief medicine handy.

 Everyone else should:

  • Reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.
  • Take more breaks, do less intense activities.
  • Schedule outdoor activities in the morning when ozone is lower.

 

Be Air Aware!

Arlo encourages you to keep an eye on the AQI by signing up for ozone alerts at Air North Texas.  

Join Arlo at Clean Air Action Day!

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